Research results positive for Prescan

12-04-2017,

Evidence based research report into the efficiency of CT scanning for a Total Body Scan as part of health screening, Committee on Medical Aspects of Radiation in the Environment (COMARE – December 2007).

Why you should choose Prescan:

Prescan provides preventative health screening with MRI scans. One of the most beneficial aspects of using MRI scans is that there is no exposure to the radiation you would receive from using CT.

Why CT Total Body Scans are bad for you:

Until recently there has been no evidence based research into the effects of CT scanning as part of a body scan for health screening purposes. Over the last few years, COMARE has been researching the impact of self referral CT scanning for the health assessment of asymptomatic individuals. In week 51 (17 December – 21 December) 2007, COMARE has published a report with the outcomes of the research.

COMARE was established in 1985 to assess and advice the government and the associated authorities on the effects of radiation on health and to assess the adequacy of the available data particularly noted was the need for further needed research.

The research of COMARE has pointed out that:

§ “There is little evidence that demonstrates, for whole body CT scanning, the benefit outweighs the detriment. We recommend therefore that services offering whole body CT scanning of asymptomatic individuals should stop doing so immediately.”

(Source: 12th report of COMARE)

§ “The level of radiation dose received by the individual that undergoes a CT scan may be significant. CT scanning of asymptomatic individuals can result in detection of a range of pathologies, including conditions of no clinical significance and conditions that will not influence an individual’s outcome, both situations that can be considered as examples of pseudo disease. Such findings could potentially result in needless

further investigations, which themselves carry additional risks and cost implications, increase the individual’s anxiety levels and affect their quality of life.”

(Source: 12th report of COMARE)

§ “It is also not clear whether CT imaging detects some cancers that are not as clinically aggressive as those identified following presentation with symptoms. It is possible that some tumours detected are ones that might be present at the individual’s death and would not have been life threatening, skewing the apparent benefit of detection by scanning.”

(Source: 12th report of Comare)

§ “The level of radiation received by the individual is an additional concern, particularly with whole body CT scanning. For an asymptomatic individual the potential risk may outweigh the benefits.”

(Source: 12th report of Comare)

§ “There are also important issues concerning sensitivity and specificity. Scans of specific anatomical regions should be optimised for this purpose and may not be able to detect conditions other than those targeted. It may not be possible to give an asymptomatic individual a complete ‘all clear’ after a scan, even though such reassurance is the expectation of the scanned individual.”

(Source: 12th report of Comare)

For more information see the twelfth report on www.comare.org.uk.